(Updated on 8/21- see end of post)

The We Are Atheism project is really exciting and inspiring:

We want to provide a platform for atheists around the globe to see that they are not alone. Atheists come in all shapes, sizes, ages, and backgrounds. The only thing that we all have in common is that we don’t see any credible evidence to believe in a god. It’s ok to be an atheist, and we want the world to know.

On their site, you can find videos of all sorts of atheists telling their stories and encouraging others to do the same.  I very rarely make videos, as I’m quite shy and almost always prefer to communicate my ideas in writing. But I’m very fond of this project, so I decided to submit a video. It will probably be posted on their site soon (and I’ll update this post when it is). I’ll also embed it below:

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Thanks for watching ♥

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Update: Yay! My video is now posted on weareatheism.com. Check it out here.

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27 Responses to In which I make a video…

  1. What a strident video! ;)
    I think that if you are able to allay the guilt of even only one person who is suffering from the truly nasty and vile mental-torture that is Catholicism, then you have acquitted yourself admirably!

    Atheism is not a dirty word.
    Now, “Crevice” is a dirty word.

  2. Nice video. It’s good to see more of us posting vids on We Are Atheism.
    It’d be nice to get some in non-English languages too.

  3. blueollie says:

    Yep, I am an ex Catholic too; the only vestige I have left is that I still cheer for Notre Dame football. :)

    You are right about the guilt/shame stuff lasting…same thing with hang ups concerning sex.

    By the way, you have a good video presence.

    • Thanks, Ollie :)

      & Oh totally! I’m not sure if the guilt/shame stuff ever really goes away. I imagine that it differs based upon our personalities and childhood experiences and how strict and intense our childhood indoctrination was, etc., but it does seem like, for the vast majority of ex-Catholics, there’s a part of our brains that reason can’t touch, even when we’ve rid ourselves of the rest of our Catholic pasts. And yes, like you say, the guilt/shame seems to be particularly intense when it comes to sexuality. I suppose that isn’t a surprise, though.

  4. Grania says:

    Very nice, Miranda, well said!
    If you can do it, I might be encouraged to do one too :)

    • Thank you, lovely! :)

      And I’d love to see a video from you! I was nervous that I wouldn’t be able to do it completely off-the-cuff like that, but it ended up being easier than I expected. And the nice thing is you can always start over if you don’t like it. Anyway, I mentioned to Professor Ceiling Cat this morning that if one or both of you decide to do one, I can help you with the technical-type settings, which I had very little understanding of before yesterday. It took me forever to figure out why the audio and video were completely out of sync on my first attempted upload until I finally realized that I had to use iMovie to convert it.

      Anyway, thank you again! ♥

  5. Justicar says:

    On the catholic guilt thing – I have a friend who’s nominally catholic. She feels guilty about everything it would seem. As she says though, “not guilty enough not to do it, but still, you know, guilty.”

    • “not guilty enough not to do it, but still, you know, guilty.”

      Oh totally! I definitely understand that. The residual guilt and shame doesn’t always prevent me from doing the “bad” (only “bad” by ridiculous Catholic standards) things I want to, but it definitely does cause me to torture myself after I’ve done them.

  6. amousbous says:

    I was a catholic too who became an atheist during my early teens. I know a bunch of people with similar experience and all mention guilt. But I never felt any guilt about the beleifs per se – the teen rebel phase was running strong and challenging relegious beliefs was very satisfying, really. The main problem I had was breaking the hearts of loved ones who really believed. Especially, my grandmother, who would have really become horrified, if she had known it. It was much easier to deal with people (like my parents, a priest who was a “friend of the family” etc) who wanted to criticize you or challenge you – but what to do, if somebody who has been a loving presence in your life, would literally crumble. It was mostly luck and lot of strategic silence/lying by everybody around, that she didn’t learn of it during her lifetime. In hindisght, I’m glad it worked out the way it did.

    There were some amusing episodes though. Once, I took her to church and got dragged into a confessional. So, I told the priest that I didn’t beleive in god and was just there to kill 3 minutes. He said for all he knew, I might be right about god.

    • The main problem I had was breaking the hearts of loved ones who really believed. Especially, my grandmother, who would have really become horrified, if she had known it. It was much easier to deal with people (like my parents, a priest who was a “friend of the family” etc) who wanted to criticize you or challenge you – but what to do, if somebody who has been a loving presence in your life, would literally crumble. It was mostly luck and lot of strategic silence/lying by everybody around, that she didn’t learn of it during her lifetime. In hindisght, I’m glad it worked out the way it did.

      Oh goodness, yes, I relate to this so much. It’s such a difficult process.

  7. Sigmund says:

    Very good video.
    I saw the post about the campaign on the Richard Dawkins site where they have videos by Greta Christina, JT Eberhard and Hemant Mehta. Some cruel person, Delogic, in the intitial comments made the remark “I love how the previews of the three videos looks like serial killers.” Unfortunately he has a point! They do!
    I think Youtube gives you an option to choose a different shot from the recording as the face of your video so I’d advise the three aforementioned contributors to choose another one!
    Your video picture was fine Miranda. Unlike the others you don’t look like you’re making a half-hearted plea to the parole board! To anyone else planning a video, make sure you smile somewhere within the recording and use that moment as the lead shot!

  8. Cain says:

    Umm…I only watch YouTube videos featuring cats. I’m going to need some kind of assurance before I click anything.

  9. mary says:

    Great video…you give me incentive to make my own…

    I’ll try to include all 5 of my cats!

  10. Qu Quine says:

    Miranda, your video also reminds me of a very precocious friend of mine. In the 7th or 8th grade in Catholic school the nuns once asked her what she was giving up for Lent. She replied, “Catholicism.”

  11. patrick says:

    Love the video. Fantastic pics.

    I totally agree with your video and I too spent time as a Catholic, but I have been free from their control for many years now.

    I wish you the best in your journeys.

  12. I’ve been a lifelong atheist (except for that time, when i was like 7 or 8, and got terrified of death, so i “decided” to believe in God, which lasted for like a day).

    As a child i was proud to be an atheist, and never had to be apologetic about it, so i really can’t relate to the struggle so many people go through. I used to be completely unaware and unsympathetic. I thought it was pure stupidity, ignorance and intellectual dishonesty. For me it was the believer, not the atheist, who needed understanding.

    Now i think atheism isn’t inherently important at all. It’s just circumstantially important. What’s really important is critical thinking, intellectual honesty, a learning disposition, things like that. If you have all of that, you WILL be an atheist.

    Atheism is important only because today’s biggest enemy of reason is religious dogma. But there are other dogmas, and there are plenty of dumb ideas. Atheists are still vulnerable to bad thinking, lazy thinking, magical thinking, emotional compromises, intellectual dishonesty, cognitive biases, hallucinations, etc. I know of an atheist who believes that alien visits are a proven fact, that she’s seen alien ships, and that her government is after her for what she knows. I’m not kidding. Her atheism is really not important.

    I don’t deny the importance of atheism in general (in the USA you have lots of problems with religious people, mainly Protestants, in Argentina we have plenty of problems with Catholics), but i’m not sure that embracing a label would be a good idea. There are plenty of dumb things most of us don’t believe in. I don’t believe in the Yeti. Does that make me an ayetist? Do i instantly belong to the ayetist community? Would that become accurate in places where most people believed in the Yeti?

    I don’t know… I prefer to advocate not for atheism, but for good thinking. It’s more ambitious, and yet (i think) better focused. ^_^

  13. […] important for those of us who experienced any form of childhood religious indoctrination to share our experiences and to encourage others to do the same. Sharing our stories and engaging in the […]

  14. Rob says:

    Great video and though I was fortunate enough not to be raised with more than a minor dose religion I did attend a Catholic school (better education). The best way to give up religion is to learn all you can about it. I find it sad that religion is so engrained in society that we have to include it in the word athesist and define ourselves by rejecting religion rather than embracing science and the wonder of the natual world.
    Humanism is a concept I find some common ground with but doesn’t quite capture all my views. I have taken to calling myself a “rational empiracist” as my own little inside joke/conversation starter. I’ve found that having a non-judgmental intellectually based conversation about why I don’t believe in a deity, ghosts, or superstitions is usually well received by all but the most devout magic space god believers.
    Great blog and the more Doctor Who references the better!

  15. Robert Lyons says:

    I’ve recently become a Miranda Celeste subscriber at Facebook, captivated by the delightful coincidence of her ample intelligence and her striking loveliness.

    Personally, I regard atheism as a great leap forward from the fanaticism and mere belief of religious faithfulness. Yet, I also conclude that there are additional leaps forward that atheists, too, might undertake.

    Among the “new atheists,” Sam Harris affirms this conclusion in a conversation with Newsweek’s Lisa Miller:

    .”I see nothing irrational about seeking the states of mind that lie at the core of many religions. Compassion, awe, devotion and feelings of oneness are surely among the most valuable experiences a person can have,” [Harris writes in, The Moral Landscape]. Over lunch, he says with a smile how much he looks forward to working on the next project, which will allow him to pull back, after six long years, and focus on things that support human flourishing. “Ecstasy, rapture, bliss, concentration, a sense of the sacred—I’m comfortable with all of that,” says Harris later. “I think all of that is indispensable and I think it’s frankly lost on much of the atheist community.”

    See, Sam Harris Believes in God, by Lisa Miller.

    To darling Miranda and all readers here, I also commend the works of Ken Wilber.

    Much love!

    [comment posted at We Are Athesism, also, pending moderation]

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